christinawilder

I'll think of a damn title later

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154 Muses
4717 BOOKS


Currently reading

Hangsaman
Shirley Jackson, Francine Prose
No Logo: No Space, No Choice, No Jobs
Naomi Klein
Progress: 158/528 pages
"I want to perform an unnatural act."

- Lenny Bruce



"I get a kick out of being an outsider constantly. It allows me to be creative. I don't like anything in the mainstream and they don't like me."

- Bill Hicks



"I don’t like ass kissers, flag wavers or team players. I like people who buck the system. Individualists. I often warn people: “Somewhere along the way, someone is going to tell you, ‘There is no “I” in team.’ What you should tell them is, ‘Maybe not. But there is an “I” in independence, individuality and integrity.’” Avoid teams at all cost. Keep your circle small. Never join a group that has a name. If they say, “We’re the So-and-Sos,” take a walk. And if, somehow, you must join, if it’s unavoidable, such as a union or a trade association, go ahead and join. But don’t participate; it will be your death. And if they tell you you’re not a team player, congratulate them on being observant."

-George Carlin



"The more I see, the less I know for sure."

- John Lennon

The Alchemist's Daughter - Katharine McMahon The Alchemist's Daughter (by Katherine McMahon) is set in early eighteenth century, where Emilie Selden is an apprentice of her father John, a natural philosopher and alchemist. She herself is an experiment of his, her learning process, with all her successes and failures being documented in a notebook by him every night. He shelters her from the outside world, and when a clergyman named Thomas Shales arrives at their home and takes an interest in Emilie, showing their shared fascination with natural philosophy, John forbids him from the home. When dashing young Robert Aislabie arrives, John's sway over his daughter is challenged and their futures are irrevocably changed.Note: I didn't find the character particularly likeable, and for most, rooted for their deaths. Take that as you will.